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SBI Micore-300 Mineral Fiber Board - Pack of Four

113.95
List Price: $149.99
Sale Price: $113.95 Free Shipping
You Save: $36.04 (24%)
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* Usually Ships within 2-3 Business Days.
  • Micore-300 mineral fiber construction
  • Pack contains four boards
  • Board Dimensions: 48" x 24" x 1/2"
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Item Description
Customer Reviews
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Versatile and sturdy, with a nearly endless list of applications, Fiber Board from SBI is simply peerless. This Micore-300 Fiber Board features mineral fiber construction for extra safety and durability. This pack contains four exceptionally high-quality Micore-300 boards. The boards themselves measure 48" x 24" x 1/2", and make for a splendid addition to whatever project you're using Fiber Core for. SBI's high quality materials are among the finest in the industry. You can't go wrong with this stellar Fiber Board from SBI.

Features

  • Micore-300 mineral fiber construction
  • Pack contains four boards
  • Board Dimensions: 48" x 24" x 1/2"
Manufacturer: SBI
Part Number: AC02565
eFireplaceStore Item Number: SBI-AC02565
UPC: 773388038650
SBI Micore-300 Mineral Fiber Board - Pack of Four
$113.95
5 Stars based on 9 Review(s)
Denis Lee
PA, United States
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Good price for hard to find Item
September 12, 2014
I was installing a slate pad for under a wood stove and wanted to protect the original hard wood floors, century and a half old house. In my area this product is not carried in the hardware stores. They could order it for me but I would have to wait for the next USG shipment of drywall, maybe weeks. Both price with shipping and timing were better than any local store offered me. Very happy , pad and stove installed.
Pros:
The product is a heat barrier, it preforms as described. The time to delivery and price were what was exceptional.
Cons:
No cons.

Chris
Willsboro, New York
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Great product, Great Price
August 13, 2014
I was already aware of the benefits of Micore for building my hearth but I was surprised to find it here for less than Amazon and the shipping was fast.
Pros:
Good product
Cons:
You can't buy one sheet.

Theresa
Boise, ID
4 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

High R value, light weight and easy to use.
June 17, 2014
We installed a wood burning stove over hardwood floors in a house with a basement. Because of the weight of the stove we didn't want to add a lot more weight in the floor pad. It needed an R value of 1.5. By using the Micore 300 in place of many layers of durarock we achieved the R value we wanted without it weighing a ton. We used 1/4 " plywood and the Micore was sandwiched between the durarock. On top is ceramic floor tile. The Micore was easy to cut and light weight. I only gave it 4 stars because I thought it was pricy.

Dean Selzer
Valley Lee, MD
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Awesome Product and Fast Free Shipping!
May 5, 2014
Micore board was exactly what I needed for my hearth!
Pros:
R-value and Free shipping!!!
Cons:
None

cody
mi
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Great Product
December 16, 2013
Exactly what I needed for my custom hearth pad and hard to find .

DW
MA
4 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Exactly What I Needed
October 30, 2013
This product is fairly hard to find, but FS had it shipped to my door very quickly. My only caveat is that it comes in a large quantity. If it came in a package with half the coverage I would have given it 5 stars.

Kurt
Mt. Holly, NJ
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Great product
October 12, 2013
If you need R value this is the product. Sandwich between two sheet of 1/2 Durarock and you can put any stove on it.
Pros:
Can be shipped anyware
Cons:
Would be nice to have a larger sheets.

Renee
Aztec, New Mexico
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

Micore-300 Mineral Fiber Board completed our Wood Stove
April 15, 2013
The product was easy to use and just what wee needed to complete our hearth for our wood stove. We had to abide by the codes since we put it into our manufactured home. I would recommend this product to others. The price was also in our budget.
Pros:
In our budget easy to use

Robert
(S. Indiana/Louisville, Kentucky
5 Stars
I would recommend this item to a friend.

A Complete Minimum Clearance Solution
February 4, 2013
I bought this product so I could comply with my wife's request that our new wood stove be placed closely as possible against the wall and without a raised hearth. This product solved all of our clearance issues in as much as a one half inch thick sheet has the heat transference protection of nearly six inches of concrete!
Pros:
Great product with excellent heat transfer retardancy values.
Cons:
There was nothing that I disliked about the product itself. I was simply surprised that it was so difficult to locate. In that regard, I am especially grateful to this store for including it in its inventory of wonderful products.



By charles from mariposa CA on January 19, 2012
What temperatures would this product withstand?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on January 19, 2012

Answer:
Per the manufacturer of the product, this board is able to provide protection from continuous temperatures of up to 450 degrees and intermittent temperatures of up to 550.

By T from usa on September 19, 2012
What is the shipping weight for the pack of four?
By Tyler M. - Fireplace Specialist on September 19, 2012

Answer:
The shipping weight on this pack of four mineral fiber boards measures 34 lbs.

By Richard Heinz from Grand Haven, MI on November 10, 2012
Is this product considered non-combustible?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on November 12, 2012

Answer:
The product is indeed considered a noncombustible insulating material. Its density is similar to a sheet of drywall and will insulate to an R value of 1.04 per 1/2 inch of material.

By Peter from Nobleboro, Maine on December 11, 2013
I want to use Micore 300 in a hearth and I assume I can tile directly on top of it. Do you know? In addition, I want to use it in the wall behind the stove as fire protection. If I did, could I use it as the substrate for tile in the wall?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on December 12, 2013

Answer:
The manufacturer advises that the Micore board can be used as a thermal backer, but tile should only be applied upon a layer of cement board that should be screwed down to the Micore. The Micore does not lend itself as a good backer material to tile upon directly, as it is not dense enough.

By Mark from Richmond, VT on September 2, 2014
I am looking to build a stone wall behind my stove which is a Jotul Oslo. The manual says I need 6" clearance and I have 8" to the stud as the dry wall was removed. For added protection, I was thinking of putting a metal hat channel on the stud then Micore to gain a 1" air gap between the wall. Could I just put the Micore on the studs? Can I mortar the stone directly to the Micore or do I need to attach a concrete board like Durock next gen to the Micore first. Also, I heard that you are not supposed to use Durock next gen behind stoves anymore but I'm not sure if they mean that you can't reduce the clearance or not.
By eFireplaceStore on September 3, 2014

Answer:
If the manual is indicating 6 inches of clearance is all that is required, anything else you are adding is simply additional protection, if you have the 8 inches you indicated. Air space beneath wall protection is only a requirement when trying to reduce clearances to a combustible wall, with the stove not currently meeting clearance requirements. In your case, the Micore can indeed be secured directly to the studs without the additional air space. The R value of the Micore alone will prevent excessive heat transfer.

Veneers do not secure well to Micore, especially in vertical applications. As such, you will need to use Durock or a similar brand of cement backer board over the Micore to secure the veneer to. I honestly have not heard anything regarding changes in clearance reductions offered by Micore. The product has consistently offered the same R value for some time now and still meets all UL requirements to be used as a floor or wall protector.

By Jason from Dallas on December 5, 2012
Is this a good product to use as a sub-floor in front of the fireplace, to be covered with tile?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on December 5, 2012

Answer:
This product was recently revised with increased density that would make it ideal for this type of application. Its superior R-value over concrete board makes it an excellent substrate to be used for hearth extensions and hearth boards/pads.

By Larry from Port Austin, MI on April 23, 2013
I want to apply ceramic tiles to the Micore-300, how would I do that? Would I first put down a coating of thin set, then place the Micore on top when installing this over 3/4" plywood? What screw spacing would you recommend?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on April 24, 2013

Answer:
Per the manufacturer, no thin set is needed between the Micore board and the plywood. The Micore can be secured directly to the plywood with coarse thread wood screws, spaced 12 to 18 inches apart.

By Curt from Cornwallville, NY on December 5, 2012
If you cut the Micore 300 into 2' x 4' pieces for wall application, does this compromise the thermal resistance of the board?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on December 5, 2012

Answer:
Cutting the Micore board will not compromise its R-value. As long as the thickness of the board is not changed in any way, the product will meet the same listed values outlined on the data sheet.

By Kimberly from NH on September 2, 2014
What is the R value of the fiber board per sheet? Can the boards be stacked to achieve higher R rating?
By eFireplaceStore on September 3, 2014

Answer:
The R value per 1/2 inch sheet of Micore is 1.04. You can indeed layer the product to achieve a higher R value, if the manufacturer requires it.

By Curt from Cornwallville, NY on November 27, 2012
Can you apply ceramic tiles directly to this board with thin set mortar? Also, I thought USG manufactured Micore 300? Is this a less reliable copy?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on November 28, 2012

Answer:
You can indeed apply ceramic tile directly to this product, but for better results it is recommended to use a layer of cement backer board over the Micore. This Micore 300 board is manufactured by USG. It is simply purchased from them and sold through the manufacturer SBI, hence the use of their name in the product description, even though they do not actually make it.

By paul from Ashland, OR on October 22, 2012
My wood stove manual has specified a floor pad with a R value of 1.2. What are my options of achieving this with a ceramic tile finish?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on October 23, 2012

Answer:
Most ceramic tile has a minimal R value, but can be used in conjunction with a product such as the Micore board you are viewing to achieve the R value you need. The R value of the board is 1.04 per sheet.

If you are able to obtain a ceramic tile that can be verified to have a value of .16 or higher, you will be in the clear to use only the 1/2 inch layer. Otherwise, a second 1/2 layer can be used to ensure proper insulation.

By Joseph Russo from Fairbanks, AK on January 25, 2012
So you sell 3/4 inch Micore 300. That's the thickest USG manufactures it and 3/4 inch would be ideal for my needs. Also my floor protection pad will require joints because of its size. What product do you recommend for joints when using Micore?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on January 26, 2012

Answer:
The thickest Micore product that we currently offer is this item. We do not offer a 3/4 Micore board at this time.

When installing Micore you can use a spreadable "mortar" that is used to seal the gap between cement board. This product is not a conventional mortar based material and is more along the lines of a silicone based product.

You may see this product at the following link:

Link

By Steve from CT on August 21, 2013
What is the value of one sheet of Micore?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on August 21, 2013

Answer:
The R-value of the Micore board is 1.03 for every 1/2 inch of board that is used.

By Michelle from St. Louis, MO on June 28, 2014
Is your mineral board similar or the same as vermiculite board? I am looking for something rigid and easily cut. I will be using it at a temp of approx 1600 degrees
By eFireplaceStore on June 30, 2014

Answer:
The fibrous board is not the same as vermiculite. It is designed to be used as an insulating barrier behind noncombustible material or in place of combustible drywall behind a stove. It is not rated for the temperatures you expect for your application. The SBI Vermiculite Board - Pack of Two can be cut to size and is rated for direct contact with flame. This product is commonly used to replace baffles in high efficiency wood burning appliances.
By Theresa from Boise, ID on July 9, 2014

Answer:
They are similar in that they are both light weight, but I'm not familiar with the heat tolerance and R value of vermiculite board. When researching materials to use for our fireplace pad, the micore 300 seemed the best choice. With the other material we put with the micore we achieved the R value of 1.5 required for our stove. The Micore was more expensive but now that we have it built I'm glad we went with it. I feel confident that we wont have a fire.
By Cody from East Lansing, MI on July 9, 2014

Answer:
It is nothing like vermiculite. It is lightweight and easily cut. As far as the temperature rating, that would have to be researched
By Joe from Newton, NJ on July 9, 2014

Answer:
I chose Micore-300 (capped with a layer of Durock), because it allowed me to achieve the required R-value for my wood stove hearth, using the shortest height possible. There are other materials you can use, but I wanted to keep the overall height of the hearth (including tile) to under 1.5 inches.

Every other material I researched would have pushed my hearth thickness to well over 2 inches. If finished hearth height is not an issue, go with something else.

I know the Micore is pricey (and difficut to locate), but it is the best material currently available.
By Jacob from Virginia on July 10, 2014

Answer:
I'm not familiar with vermiculite board, so I can't comment. But Micore is the same stuff that is in the pre-made hearth boards they sell at Lowes. It is rather soft, so it's easy to work with, though it tends to be a bit crumbly.
By John from Pennsylvania on July 10, 2014

Answer:
I used this under a raised fireplace hearth and it worked perfectly. I needed it to meet the heat transfer requirements protecting the framing underneath. Under normal circumstances, it sees no more heat than what is radiated from the fireplace warming the stone on top of it. I have 2" blue stone on top of it which is heavy but spread evenly. It cuts very easily with a utility knife and will probably compress if a lot of weight is placed in small spot. In terms of durability I would compare it to a ceiling tile.

By Max from Hedgesville, WV on October 19, 2013
My insert manufacturer specifies a 1/2 inch Micore board and 24 gauge steel sheet for floor protection. They don't say which goes on top and which is the bottom next to the floor, or how to fasten it down. What is your recommendation?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on October 21, 2013

Answer:
The 1/2 Micore board should be used as the substrate with the steel sheet placed over the top of the Micore for additional protection and finishing. If the Micore is upon a combustible surface, wood screws should be used every 6 to 8 inches to secure the Micore to the floor. The 24 gauge steel can then be secured to the Micore using construction adhesive.

By Jonathan from Hartford, CT on September 26, 2013
I am debating whether or not I can, and should, tile directly over this product for use as a wood stove hearth. I read in your FAQ section that this can be done, however, I've also read in my research that it is not strong enough to hold a wood stove. Could you shed some light on your experience with this?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on September 26, 2013

Answer:
Both pieces of information are true. This item can be tiled directly over, but that is only recommended for a wall application. Furthermore, it is better to use a layer of cement backer board over the Micore before tiling. The backer board is a better material for the tile to adhere to.

The Micore is definitely not strong enough to be used on its own as a hearth. While it is a dense material, the weight of the stove legs will cause it to compress and indent. Manufactured hearth boards use Micore, but it is usually layered between sheets of steel or cement board. As such, you can use the layer of Micore as a base, then cover it with cement board, then apply your tile.

By Heidi from Walla Walla, WA on October 13, 2013
In an earlier answer you indicated that one should screw the micore directly to the sub-floor. Then use thin set with a cement board over that. Then thin set with tile on the top. My question is regarding securing the cement board. Usually when installing the cement board to the sub-floor, I use thin set and then screw it down. But my guess is that the screws will have nothing really to grab when they get to the micore. So do I just use really big screws to get all the way to the sub-floor, or do I skip the screws for the cement board?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on October 14, 2013

Answer:
We usually recommend skipping the screws as a rule, but it really depends on the application. In many cases, a stove will require some sort of R-value for the floor protector. Using screws through the cement board will allow heat to be easily conducted down the screws to the sub floor, potentially causing scorching to the floor over time. If the stove is insulated well enough that it does not require the floor protector to have an R-value, this is not a problem. However, the thin layer of tile would not insulate well enough for a stove that does require a listed R-value and screws that penetrate to the floor should be avoided in that case.

By Gerry from San Jose, CA on January 26, 2013
Could I place a granite slab on top of the Micore 300 board?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on January 28, 2013

Answer:
The Micore 300 product is indeed dense enough for granite or stone to be placed on top of it. Most installations will require two layers of Micore to achieve the minimum required R value.

By Jared Trahan from Lafayette La. on January 17, 2012
At what temperature is this board capable of providing protection up to?
By Collin C. - NFI Master Hearth Professional on January 18, 2012

Answer:
Per the manufacturer of the product, this board is able to provide protection from continuous temperatures of up to 450 degrees and intermittent temperatures of up to 550.

By Kimberly from Ohio on August 7, 2014
I have a couple of questions. If my husband builds a hearth platform out of wood topped with plywood, can I use a combination of micore board and durock on top of the plywood to get to the desired R-value of 2.0 before adding slate tile on top? Secondly, if we have fire-resistant drywall behind the wood stove, what is the best way to finish that out to make sure it has the appropriate heat protection (or should we have cement board instead of drywall on the studs)? I've seen a lot of reference to ceramic spacers and 24 gauge sheet metal, but (not to sound stupid) do you fasten the spacers straight to the drywall or does something need to go on top of the drywall? I realize maybe I shouldn't be asking part of this questions here, but I have been looking online for hours and can't find answers.
By eFireplaceStore on August 8, 2014

Answer:
The short answer to your initial question is yes. As long as enough Micore and cement board is used to achieve the required R value (2.0 in your case), the platform beneath can be fully combustible. The slate tile can be applied directly to the cement backer board. The tile itself will have its own R value, but I don't recommend factoring that in, as the porosity and density of the slate will vary.

As for the second question, the appropriate material to use will actually depend on how close the stove will be to the wall. If the stove is positioned so that it meets minimum required clearances to the wall, standard drywall could be used. Cement board, sheet metal, or any other wall protection would only be needed if clearances need to be reduced even further. If you would like to provide the model of stove you have, whether you are using single or double wall stovepipe, and the intended proximity to the wall, I will be happy to advise further.

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